Home

The Patient Journey, Technology, and AftercareAs a recap in case you missed the beginning of this series, a patient journey map has two lines.  One line is the patient’s expected level of satisfaction.  This is the base level of expectation of what they feel a normal patient experience entails.  The second line contours the experience itself.  This line typically goes up and down throughout the patient journey, many times above the level of expectation, and many times dropping below gradually, or sometimes suddenly before returning.  These are called cliffs, and many times the patient careens off of these cliffs into a ravine of dissatisfaction. We have followed the patient from the waiting room and admissions as well as throughout their inpatient stay to see how technology may bridge the cliffs and valleys in the patient journey.  Now it’s time to look at the patient journey as it pertains to aftercare.  Ironically, the first step of aftercare actually starts in the facility itself, before the patient is discharged.

Jeff Miller, December 28, 2017

Jeff has been working in the professional AV integration industry for over twenty years. During that time he has served as Designer, Project Manager and/or Account Executive for hundreds of projects. As an Account Executive at Avidex, he specializes in Medical, Education, and Control Rooms. He can be reached at jmiller@avidex.com

The Patient Journey, Technology, and the Waiting RoomAs a recap in case you missed the beginning of this series, a patient journey map has two lines.  One line is the patient’s expected level of satisfaction.  This is the base level of expectation of what they feel a normal patient experience entails.  The second line contours the experience itself.  This line typically goes up and down throughout the patient journey, many times above the level of expectation, and many times dropping below gradually, or sometimes suddenly before returning.  These are called cliffs, and many times the patient careens off of these cliffs into a ravine of dissatisfaction. The patient journey through the Waiting Room can be full of these cliffs.  However, through the use of some innovative healthcare technology, those valleys can be bridges, assuring increased patient satisfaction. Cliff One: Wait Times Ask anyone about their worst healthcare experience and it is almost assured that you will hear them mention wait times.

Jeff Miller, December 28, 2017

Jeff has been working in the professional AV integration industry for over twenty years. During that time he has served as Designer, Project Manager and/or Account Executive for hundreds of projects. As an Account Executive at Avidex, he specializes in Medical, Education, and Control Rooms. He can be reached at jmiller@avidex.com

Journey Mapping, Technology, and the Patient Experience  Journey mapping has become a very popular exercise across several industries, including manufacturing, services and yes, you guessed it, healthcare. Journey mapping is much more than a buzzword or a fad however. It is an essential part of developing a superior patient experience. In fact, your practice or facility may have already or be in the process of creating a map of your patient journey. As a quick overview for the uninitiated- “A customer journey map tells the story of the customer's experience: from initial contact, through the process of engagement and into a long-term relationship. It may focus on a particular part of the story or give an overview of the entire experience.” Journey maps are used to improve processes and create touchpoints that assure patients are satisfied with their care both throughout their journey and with the end result of their care.

Jim Scalise, December 28, 2017

Jim is the Avidex Systems Integrated Group Manager and has been in the AV industry for more than 20 years. Jim oversees and manages the integrated systems team and is directly involved in design, application, project and field engineering as well as sales, service and installation support. Contact Jim at jscalise@avidexav.com

It’s Good to be an Organ “Droner”Drones are everywhere. Applications range from military use for fighting terrorists to aerial photography to recreational use by hobbyists and even Amazon has announced it would like to start using them for package delivery. Imagine being able to deliver packages in dense urban areas without having to worry about traffic or parking. Now imagine that instead of delivering your nephew’s birthday present, the drone is delivering something much more critical…medical care. Before you scoff at the idea, let me share a quick scenario. Imagine your 21 year old daughter is in desperate need of a heart transplant. You wring your hands, hoping that somehow a heart will become available in time to save her life. 8 miles away, a 27 year old dies in a car crash. It’s both a tragedy and a miracle as he is an organ donor and his heart is a match.

Jim Scalise, November 29, 2017

Jim is the Avidex Systems Integrated Group Manager and has been in the AV industry for more than 20 years. Jim oversees and manages the integrated systems team and is directly involved in design, application, project and field engineering as well as sales, service and installation support. Contact Jim at jscalise@avidexav.com

The ED Epidemic (and what to do about it)Nationwide, the epidemic of Emergency Departments (Emergency Rooms) being used as “primary care” by patients who don’t necessarily require emergency care has been on the increase for years. Although it varies from state to state, there are a number of variables that contribute to these occurrences. However, in all cases, an over-crowded ED can translate into ED physicians becoming a more limited resource. It goes without saying that any patient seeking care for a non-emergent event potentially procures the physicians’ time away from patients with potentially life threatening conditions. Estimates vary in regards to the percentages of ED patients who actually need emergent care, with some rates as low as 30%. The trend isn’t decreasing any time soon. In fact, healthcare systems such as Scripps Health Network (San Diego) have seen up to a 160% increase in the number of emergency room visits for non-emergent care in a single year.

Jeff Miller, June 29, 2017

Jeff has been working in the professional AV integration industry for over twenty years. During that time he has served as Designer, Project Manager and/or Account Executive for hundreds of projects. As an Account Executive at Avidex, he specializes in Medical, Education, and Control Rooms. He can be reached at jmiller@avidex.com

The Advantages of Telepsychiatry If you are a technology manager in a healthcare facility, one organization that should be on your radar is the American Telemedicine Association (ATA), whose stated mission is to help “transform healthcare by improving the quality, equity and affordability of healthcare throughout the world.” In addition to being a member community for sharing best practices, track local and state legislation as it pertains to healthcare and technology, and be connected to vendors and providers, the ATA also sponsors an annual conference each year.  At this year’s ATA conference, several companies were recognized for their thought leadership within the health care technology industry.  As a partner in the healthcare technology industry ourselves, we focus special attention to the awards given to thought leaders and pioneers in the field along with analyzing comparable trends to those that we see everyday as we assist our clients in implementing new technology.

Jeff Miller, June 13, 2017

Jeff has been working in the professional AV integration industry for over twenty years. During that time he has served as Designer, Project Manager and/or Account Executive for hundreds of projects. As an Account Executive at Avidex, he specializes in Medical, Education, and Control Rooms. He can be reached at jmiller@avidex.com

eVisits vs. Hosted Visits: What’s the Difference? Healthcare is a language all its own.  It has a unique lexicon that allows doctors, nurses, and staff to communicate with each other.  Pain can be dull or acute, fractures can be hairline or compound, and internal injuries can be ventral or dorsal and thoracic or abdominal.  All of this terminology matters a great deal in delivering care and in assuring positive patient outcomes. Likewise, the world of healthcare insurance billing also has its own lexicon and intricacies and just as in the examples above, the terminology matters.  There are e-visits and hosted visits and synchronous and asynchronous care.  The technology required to facilitate these visits differs, security considerations may differ as well, and the amount of payment each type of visit receives may be different as well.

Bob Higginbotham, April 20, 2017

Bob Higginbotham, CTS-I, CTS-D, is the Avidex National Manager of Healthcare AV. Bob has spent his 30 year career in leadership positions in the AV industry including extensive design and build work in healthcare facilities. He owned and operated a successful AV business in Texas with multiple offices in several cities where he managed a staff of over 100 employees. Bob has served as a technical consultant for a major AV manufacturer, led the technical sales team for a national video conferencing provider and provided technology auditing services for several private education facilities. He has a unique working knowledge of audiovisual technology as well as multiple certifications in audio engineering, acoustics, AV design, CQT system commissioning and video transmission systems. Bob holds a BA in communications and has recently served as board chair for a large private school. He brings his years of technical knowledge and leadership experience to Avidex where he leads the national healthcare AV team. Contact Bob at bobh@avidexav.com

Aligning OutcomesA couple months back we took a look at how important patient satisfaction is becoming in healthcare. Payments are transferring to a model that evaluates outcomes and requires that the patient is satisfied with their care in order to receive the full amount billed for the services rendered. One potential problem for providers however, is trying to hit a satisfaction target that varies from patient to patient. Two patients could receive identical treatment for identical issues from the same practitioner and those two people may rate their experiences completely differently. The challenge is that patients bring their own situational implications with them. Each patient has a different history with a variety of providers, and those experiences shape the expectations of the patient. If there’s one thing that is certain about satisfaction, it is that it's implicitly tied to expectation.

Jeff Miller, February 22, 2017

Jeff has been working in the professional AV integration industry for over twenty years. During that time he has served as Designer, Project Manager and/or Account Executive for hundreds of projects. As an Account Executive at Avidex, he specializes in Medical, Education, and Control Rooms. He can be reached at jmiller@avidex.com

Will Obamacare be Trump’d? (and does it really matter?)On the 20th of January, a new president took office. Barack Obama graciously exited the White House handing the keys to the inbound Donald J. Trump. President Trump was a vocal opponent of the Affordable Care Act, (ACA), and had promised to reverse it once in office. What ultimately happens to President Obama’s signature piece of legislation is yet to be seen. It may be revamped or it may be scrapped altogether, but when it comes to technology adoption in healthcare, does it really matter? To answer that question we need to look at a few other pieces of legislation as well as general trends in healthcare. The first piece of legislation that is important is the Tele-Med Act of 2015. We detailed the implications of this bill in another post about a year ago. In general, “The Tele-Med Act of 2015 may just lower existing barriers to implementing telemedicine services, especially across state lines.

Anthony Paoletti, January 31, 2017

Anthony brings over 23 years of audiovisual experience and has worn nearly every "hat" in the industry; from Consultant to End User; Account Representative to Install Technician; Project Manager to Systems Engineer. Contact Anthony at apaoletti@avidexav.com

Artificial Intelligence in HealthcareIf you are an avid follower of technology news, you can’t help but have heard the term “AI”. AI stands for Artificial Intelligence, a field of technology pioneered by Alan Turing when he created a machine to break the German’s Enigma Code during World War II. The end goal for those developing AI will be the creation of a sentient machine that can think like a human being. Needless to say, that is still a long way off. However, during the course of 2016, the field of AI saw many advancements and investments, and the large number of those were related to healthcare applications. Why is that? “Machine learning is improving diagnostics, predicting outcomes, and just beginning to scratch the surface of personalized care.” In order to understand exactly how technology can contribute to better patient outcomes, we need to look beyond the vision of the sentient robot and focus in on two very specific areas where AI can assist medical professionals today.

Jeff Miller, January 24, 2017

Jeff has been working in the professional AV integration industry for over twenty years. During that time he has served as Designer, Project Manager and/or Account Executive for hundreds of projects. As an Account Executive at Avidex, he specializes in Medical, Education, and Control Rooms. He can be reached at jmiller@avidex.com