Tag Archives: remote monitoring

Telemetry. What is it and why is it good for healthcare?

Telemetry. It’s a word I had heard many times, but it was usually closely associated in my mind with rockets and space shuttles.  To be honest, the first time I heard it used in relation to healthcare I was a little taken aback.Telemetry photo  In fact, it caused me to look up a word I thought I knew for a formal definition. This is what I found:

Telemetry is an automated communications process by which measurements are made and other data collected at remote or inaccessible points and transmitted to receiving equipment for monitoring. The word is derived from Greek roots: tele = remote, and metron = measure.

In the light of that definition, the immediate impact of telemetry on healthcare, especially telemedicine came clearly into focus. In fact, looking further down the page of search results for telemetry, I noticed several results for a Telemetry Nurse as well, further solidifying an immediate link between the two disciplines.

If you run a hospital, you are most likely already very familiar with what a Telemetry Nurse does, but here is the description as posted by a University that offers degree programs for nurses.

Telemetry nurses work with patients that require special monitoring, including those recently released from the intensive care unit of a hospital. The patients they work with are often at high risk for complications, so RNs in a telemetry unit must carefully review equipment and data to detect potential symptoms of distress or danger.

Given that this type of physical on-premise equipment has been used in hospitals for quite some time, telemetry is not in any way actually new to medicine at all. However as technology advances, the applications for telemetry become wider and wider.

With the proliferation of internet connected devices and sensors, or the Internet of Things (IoT), telemetry extends beyond the on-premise, state-of-the-art equipment inside the nation’s hospitals and effectively becomes available wherever the patient may be. In fact the problem is no longer collecting the data for interpretation. Now the challenge becomes sifting through irrelevant data to find the important pieces, as well as securing that data to ensure the privacy of all that health information as it streams from a sensor through the internet, and to the nurse or physician it is intended for.

Think about the trends in technology today. People are already using telemetry in a personal way to manage wellness. They use Apple Watches or Fit Bits to track their steps and heart rates, track sleeping habits, and even set REM sensitive alarms to assure that they are always morning people. Companies like Google are even going a step further. Currently they have filed several patents on a glucose sensing contact lens, that not only tracks blood glucose levels, but also connects to the internet and smart devices, as well as includes a heads up display for the person wearing it to see the data from the lens right on their eye!

Now imagine taking all of this telemetry data and being able to share or save it right to your Electronic Health Records so that your physician has access to it to help determine the best care to give. Some say it’s comforting, others think it’s a bit scary, but in either case, it is objectively valuable to the care provider on the other end. If you consider for example some of the tragedies we have seen befall collegiate athletes because they collapse during a game from an undiagnosed condition, could it not be argued that telemetry may have reported some objective data beforehand, even though the athlete wasn’t noticing any symptoms themselves?

These are some of the encouraging promises of big data and healthcare. People like to focus on the negative side sometimes; that the insurance companies may get this data somehow and then deny insurance based on the figures. But on the flip side, your physician could be getting the data and proactively address a potentially life threatening condition as well. The risk of the first may be more than negated by the benefit of the second.

The point is that telemetry has in fact been here for a while in the ER and ICU, but now, in the new connected environment, just like a video conferencing system connects doctors and patients remotely for appointments and check-ups, telemetry connects the biometric data your body produces day in and day out to a physical data log. This allows that same physician to prescribe better treatments during those appointments and even to proactively help you manage your health long term.

I heard someone on a medical program state that “the first person to live to 150 has already been born.” IT is definitely something to ponder, and given the state of medical technology, it doesn’t seem like an outlandish claim. I can’t help but think that telemetry will play a huge role in the active management of personal health, transforming the doctor patient relationship from one of “break-fix” to a true collaboration that gives us all the ability to live long and healthy lives.

Avidex AV is revolutionizing the way healthcare facilities and doctors are delivering care. Their 20 years of experience is being leveraged to drive down the cost of care while promoting positive healthcare outcomes. Is your organization looking for a new kind of technology partner? Connect with one of our Account Executives today to learn more.

Resources:

#1: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telemetry

#2: http://www.jacksonvilleu.com/resources/career/telemetry-nurse-job-description-salary/#.VruC_PkrLIU

#3: http://blog.avidex.com/next-stop-the-ioh-will-there-be-an-internet-of-healthcare/

#4: http://blog.avidex.com/the-doctors-watch-just-stole-my-medical-records-and-other-strange-tales/

#5: http://diatribe.org/google-secures-patent-glucose-sensing-contact-lens

Bob Higginbotham

About Bob Higginbotham

Bob Higginbotham, CTS-I, CTS-D, is the Avidex National Manager of Healthcare AV. Bob has spent his 30 year career in leadership positions in the AV industry including extensive design and build work in healthcare facilities. He owned and operated a successful AV business in Texas with multiple offices in several cities where he managed a staff of over 100 employees. Bob has served as a technical consultant for a major AV manufacturer, led the technical sales team for a national video conferencing provider and provided technology auditing services for several private education facilities. He has a unique working knowledge of audiovisual technology as well as multiple certifications in audio engineering, acoustics, AV design, CQT system commissioning and video transmission systems. Bob holds a BA in communications and has recently served as board chair for a large private school. He brings his years of technical knowledge and leadership experience to Avidex where he leads the national healthcare AV team. Contact Bob at bobh@avidexav.com

Video: Keeping Patients Out of ERs

If everything goes as Health and Human Services (HHS) has planned for the next three years, a major share of Medicare spending could be moving toward accountable healthcare, instead of the traditional or fee-for-service care that we are familiar with. A recent article published on MobiHealthNews.com has discussed the implications of this move in the context of the growing popularity of digital healthcare.

HHS Secretary Sylvia M. Burwell has recently announced a goal to tie “30 percent of traditional, or fee-for-service, Medicare payments to quality or value through alternative payment models, such as Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) or bundled payment arrangements by the end of 2016, and tying 50 percent of payments to these models by the end of 2018.”

With the general trend gradually shifting towards value-based care, medical caregivers across the country are striving to provide digital health programs, such as those based on remote monitoring and telemedicine, to support new care delivery models. Bloomberg has reported that Philadelphia’s Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, a 1,000 bed facility with $2.1 billion in operating revenue, and allegedly one of the most expensive places for medical care, is investing $20 million to open two new urgent-care centers, and to create a virtual consultation program using video apps so that patients with routine medical needs can stay in touch with their doctors and caregivers from the comfort of their home.

The first-of-its-kind video program, which was rolled out for testing late last year, already includes 100 Jefferson staff working as a team. In the next step of the program, the hospital’s providers will be able to collaborate with patients’ primary care providers post-discharge. Jefferson’s long-term plan is to build a “virtual emergency department” that would eliminate the need for patients to come to the ER. Dr. Judd Hollander, an ER doctor at Jefferson, said that the success of the program will truly arrive “when the ERs start closing.”

Talking about the program, Jefferson CEO Steve Klasko told Bloomberg: “The best way to save the system lots of money is to keep [patients] out of the hospital.” Even doctors and economists believe that this approach is not only better for patients but is also necessary to control medical expenditure in the U.S., which is higher than anywhere else in the world. However, the idea is not so great for hospitals that drive added revenue through “more tests, fancier treatments, and longer hospital stays.”

It will be interesting to watch the developments in Medicare spending. How do you think the impact will play out across the industry? We would love to hear your thoughts.

Bob Higginbotham

About Bob Higginbotham

Bob Higginbotham, CTS-I, CTS-D, is the Avidex National Manager of Healthcare AV. Bob has spent his 30 year career in leadership positions in the AV industry including extensive design and build work in healthcare facilities. He owned and operated a successful AV business in Texas with multiple offices in several cities where he managed a staff of over 100 employees. Bob has served as a technical consultant for a major AV manufacturer, led the technical sales team for a national video conferencing provider and provided technology auditing services for several private education facilities. He has a unique working knowledge of audiovisual technology as well as multiple certifications in audio engineering, acoustics, AV design, CQT system commissioning and video transmission systems. Bob holds a BA in communications and has recently served as board chair for a large private school. He brings his years of technical knowledge and leadership experience to Avidex where he leads the national healthcare AV team. Contact Bob at bobh@avidexav.com

polycom photo vid con

How is Video-as-a-Service (VaaS) helping the healthcare sector?

Video collaboration technology has been at the forefront of healthcare innovations recently. With the widespread adoption of telehealth and remote monitoring across the U.S and other countries worldwide, video is increasingly becoming a part of mainstream healthcare. The promise of the highest quality treatment, continuity of care, and round-the-clock medical assistance at lower cost than traditional healthcare practices make video contributions quite desirable. In this context, an article published on Polycom’s official blog discussed the scope of Video-as-a-Service (VaaS) in the modern healthcare sector taking into account, UK-based VaaS service provider, Imerja’s contributions in telehealthcare.

So what is VaaS?  It is a video conferencing solution that is fully-managed, hosted, and delivered on demand by a service provider. This mode of service ensures the highest quality video experience without having to incur infrastructure expenses. As a provider of simple, secure, and reliable VaaS services, Imerja extends remote monitoring capabilities to doctors and clinicians who can make critical decisions on treatment and care as efficiently as they would in a face-to-face scenario.

The article discusses various successful VaaS deployments driven by Imerja across hospitals and medical facilities in the U.K. Here is a sampling of them:

  • Video deployment in Alder Hey Hospital pediatric neurology department has eliminated the need for patients to travel in order to receive care from a specialist.
  • Lancashire Teaching Hospital’s renal department has enabled patients to perform dialysis at home under expert medical supervision and guidance via video conferencing.
  • Using video conferencing, Lancashire and Cumbria Telestroke Network have been able to save many patients’ lives through round-the-clock expert assistance, which can deliver post-stroke thrombolysis treatment.

Video-as-a-Service has improved treatment outcomes and patient experiences significantly, while helping hospitals save costs. Besides the cost savings, VaaS also provides the following benefits:

  • Enables better remote collaboration for faster response on critical medical conditions.
  • Takes treatment and care out of hospitals, providing 100% utilization rate across each hospital.
  • Prevents clinics from getting overcrowded and allowing effective space-utilization.
  • Allows patients in remote locations and rural areas with limited medical facilities to access quality healthcare at lower costs.

Providing both patients and healthcare providers with numerous benefits, VaaS has the power to transform the healthcare sector like never before by putting expert care within the reach of patients regardless of their location and ability to travel to a hospital or care center.

In what other ways do you think VaaS will extend the benefits of telemedicine, telehealth, and remote monitoring? We would love to hear your thoughts.

Bob Higginbotham

About Bob Higginbotham

Bob Higginbotham, CTS-I, CTS-D, is the Avidex National Manager of Healthcare AV. Bob has spent his 30 year career in leadership positions in the AV industry including extensive design and build work in healthcare facilities. He owned and operated a successful AV business in Texas with multiple offices in several cities where he managed a staff of over 100 employees. Bob has served as a technical consultant for a major AV manufacturer, led the technical sales team for a national video conferencing provider and provided technology auditing services for several private education facilities. He has a unique working knowledge of audiovisual technology as well as multiple certifications in audio engineering, acoustics, AV design, CQT system commissioning and video transmission systems. Bob holds a BA in communications and has recently served as board chair for a large private school. He brings his years of technical knowledge and leadership experience to Avidex where he leads the national healthcare AV team. Contact Bob at bobh@avidexav.com

Design vs. Disruption in 2015

The healthcare industry is experiencing a mighty wave of technology that is inevitably changing its landscape. Last year, we saw the telehealth market booming, and a wide-scale adoption of telemedicine and remote monitoring took place. Those changes indicate the coming of a bigger and more divisive force that could change the face of healthcare sector completely. Many are wondering if the approach is best suited for the healthcare industry, or if a more sustainable and design-oriented approach is more appropriate. A recent article featured in MedCity.com discusses the Disruption vs. Design conundrum in the context of the healthcare industry.

The article cites the views of Gabriella Rosen Kellerman, senior manager for clinical design for San Francisco-based Castlight Health, who has questioned the viability of the disruptive model of innovation in her review of “Think Big, Start Small, Move Fast: A Blueprint for Transformation from the Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation.” The book, written by the three founding members of Mayo’s Center for Innovation, Nicholas LaRusso, Barbara Spurrier and Gianrico Farrugia, talks about a more subtle approach to innovation in healthcare: sustaining or “transformational” innovation, which is “an evolutionary form of innovation built on an undivided focus on the customer and customer experience,” they write.

Design is an important factor for these authors and they assert that, when applied properly and practiced over time, it can eliminate the need for disruption. Kellerman has observed that the Mayo Clinic’s Center for Innovation is “implicitly skeptical” of the disruptive theory:

“The authors of ‘Think Big’ are quick to acknowledge the relatively modest ambitions of their brand of innovation. ‘Is our Pediatric Phlebotomy Chair a disruptive innovation? … Probably not,’ they write.” Although it did transform the patient experience, it’s hardly a game changer —and really, that’s by design. Tearing down everything and starting over is not an option in health care.” According to Kellerman, supporting design-oriented innovation is not meant to reject the disruptive approach, but rather to promote “non-disruptive innovation—not because the theory of disruption is bankrupt, but because sustaining innovation is a necessary and valid endeavor in its own right.”

With the promise of new technologies starting to transform the healthcare industry, the coming years will witness industry evolution in new ways. We’ll have to wait and watch if the changes that occur disrupt or take on a more design-oriented approach.

We would love for you to share your thoughts about the pros and cons of the Disruption vs. Design approach in the healthcare industry. Which way do you think we are headed?

Jeff Miller

About Jeff Miller

Jeff has been working in the professional AV integration industry for over twenty years. During that time he has served as Designer, Project Manager and/or Account Executive for hundreds of projects. As an Account Executive at Avidex, he specializes in Medical, Education, and Control Rooms. He can be reached at jmiller@avidex.com

Telemonitoring – An Effective Method of Chronic Care and Treatment

As a part of their mHealth summit preview, mHealthNews.com recently featured an article that discussed how remote monitoring and telemonitoring are improving patient’s chronic care during in-between visits. How is telemonitoring impacting treatment these days and what does the future hold?

Currently, patients suffering from chronic conditions usually make periodic visits to their doctor’s office where their health data is collected and examinations are done. But, what happens in-between those visits? There is a pronounced gap in the continuity of treatment and care that impedes effective management of chronic conditions. Lately, telemonitoring is garnering a lot of attention as a possible way to close this gap.

According to Scott Flacks, COO of Ideal Life, a Toronto-based provider of customizable wireless health management monitors, proper management of chronic conditions requires records to be maintained on a daily basis. These more frequent record keeping efforts not only offer better chronic care, but also lower the cost of healthcare by helping to reduce the frequency of hospital visits.

The University of California, Department of Medicine recently conducted a study on 1,500 patients, and found that remote monitoring and telephone-assisted intervention by healthcare professionals lessened the chances of hospital readmissions among patients with heart failure. The results of the study are quite impressive.

The article cited Flacks’ view about the report: “the study used randomized cases to evaluate care transition intervention that included pre-discharge education about heart failure and post-discharge telephone nurse coaching, along with home telemonitoring of weight, blood pressure, and heart rate. It’s being billed as one of the largest randomized controlled trials of telemonitoring in patients with heart failure, and the first to combine the care transition approach with remote telemonitoring.” Researchers are hailing the study as “a rich resource of information on how best to use remote technology in the care management of patients with chronic heart failure.”

Another study was conducted at the Vidant Health system in North Carolina on 700 cardiac patients using biometrics and Ideal Life monitors. The results of that study showed that telemonitoring reduced bed days, re-admissions, and costs by as much as 66%, saving almost $4.4 million in healthcare expenses.

Flacks also pointed out that there’s a marked difference between asking the patient how he/she is feeling at home and monitoring the day-to-day condition of the patients first hand. “Giving doctors daily readings can’t do anything but help,” he said. Flacks dubbed telemedicine and telemonitoring “the healthcare of the future,” concluding that “In the end, it’s all about keeping the patient healthy and out of the hospital.”

Recent studies look like a win/win for telemonitoring. Do you think telemonitoring will become more widely adopted and lead to better chronic care and treatment?

Bob Higginbotham

About Bob Higginbotham

Bob Higginbotham, CTS-I, CTS-D, is the Avidex National Manager of Healthcare AV. Bob has spent his 30 year career in leadership positions in the AV industry including extensive design and build work in healthcare facilities. He owned and operated a successful AV business in Texas with multiple offices in several cities where he managed a staff of over 100 employees. Bob has served as a technical consultant for a major AV manufacturer, led the technical sales team for a national video conferencing provider and provided technology auditing services for several private education facilities. He has a unique working knowledge of audiovisual technology as well as multiple certifications in audio engineering, acoustics, AV design, CQT system commissioning and video transmission systems. Bob holds a BA in communications and has recently served as board chair for a large private school. He brings his years of technical knowledge and leadership experience to Avidex where he leads the national healthcare AV team. Contact Bob at bobh@avidexav.com

Retail Weds Healthcare: An improved Scope for Remote Treatment?

A recent article published on MedCityNews.com has brought forth a new development that is very significant from the standpoint of consumer-driven healthcare. Minneapolis based retailing giant, Target Corporation, is joining hands with Kaiser Permanente, a leading healthcare provider based in California. They are set to open four in-store Target Clinics in Southern California, a move that can be viewed as a new step toward the fusion of retail and healthcare industries.

Three clinics have already been opened at Target stores in Vista, San Diego, and Fontana, and a fourth clinic is about to open in West Fullerton. All of these clinics will have nurses and practitioners from Kaiser Permanente.

While it’s not entirely new for Target to maintain in-store clinics, which they have been doing for almost a decade at a number of stores, this new venture will allow them to offer a wider range of healthcare services than they had previously offered in retail outlets. According to John Holcomb, vice president of healthcare for Target, the new offering will include a wide range of services such as telemedicine consultations, prescription reviews, pediatric primary care visits, OB-GYN services, vaccinations and flu shots, pediatric and adolescent care, and management of chronic illnesses like diabetes and high blood pressure.

He pointed out that a key element of the collaboration is telemedicine, which combines Kaiser’s IT infrastructure with Target. This, he hoped, would cut the “dead ends” existing in the retail healthcare environment and broaden the scope of care available.

What might ensure the partnership is an exchange of data between the healthcare and the retail giant that could lead to a better understanding of patients through an improved vision of health IT and inter-operability. Holcomb said, “For the Kaiser member, from an IT perspective, we’re also able to integrate their records into Target. This is going to help us learn…I think that’s going to help the industry evolve.” He also explained that any access to patient information will be for the sole purpose of providing healthcare. Patient data will not be shared between the retail side and the healthcare side.

In Kaiser’s case, partnering with the retail leader “is the evolution of expanding” its services “into a setting that will provide patients with wellness support,” said Paul Minardi, medical director of business management.

Bob Higginbotham

About Bob Higginbotham

Bob Higginbotham, CTS-I, CTS-D, is the Avidex National Manager of Healthcare AV. Bob has spent his 30 year career in leadership positions in the AV industry including extensive design and build work in healthcare facilities. He owned and operated a successful AV business in Texas with multiple offices in several cities where he managed a staff of over 100 employees. Bob has served as a technical consultant for a major AV manufacturer, led the technical sales team for a national video conferencing provider and provided technology auditing services for several private education facilities. He has a unique working knowledge of audiovisual technology as well as multiple certifications in audio engineering, acoustics, AV design, CQT system commissioning and video transmission systems. Bob holds a BA in communications and has recently served as board chair for a large private school. He brings his years of technical knowledge and leadership experience to Avidex where he leads the national healthcare AV team. Contact Bob at bobh@avidexav.com

The Changing Landscape for Healthcare CIOs

Over the past decade, the healthcare sector has gone through significant changes, and with the growing importance of technology in healthcare, the change has been substantial. The healthcare sector has not only embraced tech innovations such as telehealth, remote monitoring, and unified communications, but it is also developing new ways to implement these innovations, from creating better treatment procedures to positively impacting the overall healthcare system. As such, the role of hospital CIOs has transformed drastically.

A recent article in MedcityNews.com provides a view into the moving landscape of the Healthcare CIO as a major influencer and decision maker. Comparing the current state of a hospital CIO to that of an “embattled soldier”, the article cites the views of Jim Turnbull, CIO for University Utah Healthcare. He has started describing his job as VUCA, a military acronym for volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity.

This isn’t so strange considering that today’s healthcare market is more dynamic than ever before. Over the past three years, as most healthcare IT departments have been busy implementing the EHR technology, “When they lifted up their heads, they realized the world had changed dramatically,” said Turnbull at CHIME14 in San Antonio, calling the state of healthcare IT “intense.” Down the road, hospitals will face a growing need to consider wearable technology, the concept of accountable care, more robust security for its tech spaces, and varying reimbursement models, among many other concerns. Their ability to grasp needs and evolve accordingly will determine how well they can use technology to combat health issues and give patients a better experience, every time.

Rick Schooler, Vice President and CIO for Orlando Health, however, feels “intense” is too mild a term to describe the tumultuous state of today’s healthcare industry. “There really is too much going on at once,” he says. “What’s going on in our organizations is really nuts. Our people are getting jerked around almost endlessly.”

According to Turnbull, given the current state of healthcare, CIOs must emphasize collaboration and partnership as the key to maintain the fine balance. And, patients, of course, should be prioritized. This is how present-day CIOs need to deal with the dynamically shifting landscape of healthcare tech. It will be interesting to watch how the industry adapts under this constant state of change.

At Avidex AV, we seek to partner with healthcare organizations to deliver audio, video, collaboration and telemedicine solutions that drive innovation and improved efficiencies for our clients. Let’s connect to see how we can help your organization meet its technology needs.

Joel Harris

About Joel Harris

Joel Harris brings invaluable insight to the Avidex team in his role as CEO, with years of experience leading national technology, healthcare and business organizations. You can reach Joel at jharris@avidexav.com

Case Study – Remote Monitoring in ICU

While telemedicine is creating ripples in the healthcare sector, remote care is being adopted by many clinics and healthcare providers to offer better healthcare to patients without the escalating cost of traditional medicine. An article published in EHRIntelligence.com earlier this year delineated the current state of telemedicine and remote monitoring facilities in the U.S through a case study of remote monitoring applied by Missouri-based Catholic health system, the Sisters of Mercy Health System. As the 6th largest Catholic health system in the U.S, Mercy boasts a well-developed telemedicine infrastructure that enables round-the-clock monitoring of patients, both in-house and remote. With an innovative tele-ICU program serving thousands of patients, Mercy is well on its way to opening the gates to nation’s first dedicated telehealth center in 2015.

In the article, the Vice President of Mercy’s Telehealth Services, Wendy Diebert, explained how Mercy uses telehealth for cases of intensive care and for monitoring most critically-ill patients. How did they do it? Let’s take a look:

They have a robust telehealth infrastructure

While most healthcare systems start with e-consultation as the first step toward adopting telemedicine, Mercy launched its telemedicine campaign with the e-ICU first. With over 450 tele-ICU beds across Missouri, 15 hospitals and 28 ICU units, they have approximately10-12 nurses for each shift, and five physicians for round-the-clock support. All of Mercy’s clinics have at least three telemedicine rooms to facilitate remote monitoring and treatment for all kinds of healthcare issues.

Their telehealth system is agnostic to EHR         

Mercy’s telehealth software is agnostic to EHR, which allows them to assess the level of patient care on a broader level. They analyze and compare the data from various ICUs and care centers in their systems to evaluate their performance. This helps them to apply the best performance metrics to all the other ICUs in their system.

On reimbursement and physician licensing challenges

Mercy has two and a half FTEs solely dedicated to licensing, credentialing, and privileging. While they have been credentialed at most hospitals, they still have some applications pending to be credentialed, which will make their processes even more robust.

Primary takeaways from Mercy’s case study:

This is a fascinating look at telemedicine at work. Some of the key takeaways and factors contributing to their overall success with this program include:

Interoperability of systems and software can be achieved by using agnostic technology that fuels better expansion and collaboration.

  • Having only a telemedicine infrastructure won’t drive results. Infrastructure needs to be combined with appropriate healthcare staff to create an efficient telemedicine healthcare system. In other words, building it is great, but if you don’t allocate resources for the staff you’ll need to keep it running, it most likely won’t scale.
  • Keeping the patients in their own community while they can receive the best degree of treatment and care should be the main motto of telemedicine facilities.

Have you included any of these methods in your telemedicine strategy?

Bob Higginbotham

About Bob Higginbotham

Bob Higginbotham, CTS-I, CTS-D, is the Avidex National Manager of Healthcare AV. Bob has spent his 30 year career in leadership positions in the AV industry including extensive design and build work in healthcare facilities. He owned and operated a successful AV business in Texas with multiple offices in several cities where he managed a staff of over 100 employees. Bob has served as a technical consultant for a major AV manufacturer, led the technical sales team for a national video conferencing provider and provided technology auditing services for several private education facilities. He has a unique working knowledge of audiovisual technology as well as multiple certifications in audio engineering, acoustics, AV design, CQT system commissioning and video transmission systems. Bob holds a BA in communications and has recently served as board chair for a large private school. He brings his years of technical knowledge and leadership experience to Avidex where he leads the national healthcare AV team. Contact Bob at bobh@avidexav.com