Category Archives: Telemedicine

Calling in Sick

When you think of a school nurse, you may imagine a cheery, young health professional whose day consists of waiting for the random child to come into the nurse’s office nee6539946 - smiling nurse sitting and working at her computerding their temperature taken, maybe aspirin for a headache, or a skinned knee from the playground cleaned and bandaged. Perhaps if the child is deemed sick and potentially contagious, the nurse may call the child’s parent(s) to come and pick them up from school. The stakes in these instances seem relatively low, so it is no wonder that when faced with budget cuts, schools look at the full time registered nurse as an unnecessary expense. They may instead train someone in the office on basic triage and transfer the responsibility for minor ailments to teachers as well.

But are the savings worth the true cost?

The truth is, the role of the school nurse has changed dramatically over time. According to a recent cost-benefit study of school nursing services,

“During the past few decades, several major changes in our society have greatly increased the demand for school nursing services, including a rise in the number of students with chronic health conditions and mental health problems, an increase in the number of students with special care needs, and improved medical technology. As a result, school nursing services have expanded greatly from their original focus of reducing communicable disease–related absenteeism to providing episodic care, managing chronic health conditions, caring for students with disabilities, promoting health behaviors, enrolling children in health insurance and connecting them with health care providers, tracking communicable diseases, and handling medical emergencies.”

Given this, if today’s educational environment and student needs require access to a nurse’s presence at school and the financial state of the school or district cannot support a full-time nurse, what is a responsible school to do?

Today 45% of schools in the US have a full-time nurse, yet only 25% have no nurse at all. So what are the other 30% of schools doing? They either have a part-time nurse or they share a nurse between multiple schools or campuses.

Sharing a nurse across multiple schools can be challenging. In districts where the schools may be close geographically, there is time spent traveling back and forth and given Murphy’s law, I could almost guarantee that in emergency situations, the nurse is most likely at the wrong campus when the event occurs.

In more remote or rural areas, where the district may be a whole county or multiple counties, travel between campuses on a day to day basis may be physically impossible. In these situations, if the school cannot afford dedicated nurses, they either opt out of having a nurse altogether or parents just have to hope their child only needs a nurse at school on Tuesday.

So whether you are a school that currently shares a nurse looking for more efficiency, a school that has opted out of a nurse altogether because there are not sufficient funds and sharing is nearly impossible, or even one of the 45% of schools that currently has a full-time nurse but may be forced by budgetary cuts to reconsider that cost, there is something you should be looking at… telemedicine.

Telemedicine can greatly increase the efficiency of sharing a nurse between schools by eliminating the need for travel between locations. In districts with schools that are close together, this eliminates the time and expense of traveling constantly between locations. In places where schools are far apart, this may mean access to a nurse where none was ever available before.

Telemedicine allows schools to make a small one time investment in video teleconferencing technology like high definition cameras and video monitors to facilitate real time, face to face conversations between students and nursing professionals. Enhanced systems could also utilize relatively inexpensive biometric hardware like heart rate and temperature sensors allowing nurses to collect current vitals from the students that they are looking at and talking to, greatly increasing the quality of care prescribed.

The ability to record and store these nurse-student encounters also provides the district a record of mental health counseling and medical treatments. When combined with access to the students’ Electronic Health Records (EHRs), this also helps mitigate any liability the school or district may have in providing these healthcare services to students.

Telemedicine in the school nurse’s office may just be the way to help schools with full-time nurses reduce costs without sacrificing the health of their students, a path to increased efficiency and better quality of care in schools that share nurses, and a way for those who could never afford a nurse to get access to one. Given that the health of our children is at stake, it’s definitely an investment worth making.

Avidex AV is revolutionizing the way healthcare facilities and doctors are delivering care. Their 20 years of experience is being leveraged to drive down the cost of care while promoting positive healthcare outcomes. Is your organization looking for a new kind of technology partner? Connect with one of our Account Executives today to learn more.

Resources:

#1: http://archpedi.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1872779

#2: http://www.nasn.org/Research/CostBenefitAnalysis

Bob Higginbotham

About Bob Higginbotham

Bob Higginbotham, CTS-I, CTS-D, is the Avidex National Manager of Healthcare AV. Bob has spent his 30 year career in leadership positions in the AV industry including extensive design and build work in healthcare facilities. He owned and operated a successful AV business in Texas with multiple offices in several cities where he managed a staff of over 100 employees. Bob has served as a technical consultant for a major AV manufacturer, led the technical sales team for a national video conferencing provider and provided technology auditing services for several private education facilities. He has a unique working knowledge of audiovisual technology as well as multiple certifications in audio engineering, acoustics, AV design, CQT system commissioning and video transmission systems. Bob holds a BA in communications and has recently served as board chair for a large private school. He brings his years of technical knowledge and leadership experience to Avidex where he leads the national healthcare AV team. Contact Bob at bobh@avidexav.com

Telemetry. What is it and why is it good for healthcare?

Telemetry. It’s a word I had heard many times, but it was usually closely associated in my mind with rockets and space shuttles.  To be honest, the first time I heard it used in relation to healthcare I was a little taken aback.Telemetry photo  In fact, it caused me to look up a word I thought I knew for a formal definition. This is what I found:

Telemetry is an automated communications process by which measurements are made and other data collected at remote or inaccessible points and transmitted to receiving equipment for monitoring. The word is derived from Greek roots: tele = remote, and metron = measure.

In the light of that definition, the immediate impact of telemetry on healthcare, especially telemedicine came clearly into focus. In fact, looking further down the page of search results for telemetry, I noticed several results for a Telemetry Nurse as well, further solidifying an immediate link between the two disciplines.

If you run a hospital, you are most likely already very familiar with what a Telemetry Nurse does, but here is the description as posted by a University that offers degree programs for nurses.

Telemetry nurses work with patients that require special monitoring, including those recently released from the intensive care unit of a hospital. The patients they work with are often at high risk for complications, so RNs in a telemetry unit must carefully review equipment and data to detect potential symptoms of distress or danger.

Given that this type of physical on-premise equipment has been used in hospitals for quite some time, telemetry is not in any way actually new to medicine at all. However as technology advances, the applications for telemetry become wider and wider.

With the proliferation of internet connected devices and sensors, or the Internet of Things (IoT), telemetry extends beyond the on-premise, state-of-the-art equipment inside the nation’s hospitals and effectively becomes available wherever the patient may be. In fact the problem is no longer collecting the data for interpretation. Now the challenge becomes sifting through irrelevant data to find the important pieces, as well as securing that data to ensure the privacy of all that health information as it streams from a sensor through the internet, and to the nurse or physician it is intended for.

Think about the trends in technology today. People are already using telemetry in a personal way to manage wellness. They use Apple Watches or Fit Bits to track their steps and heart rates, track sleeping habits, and even set REM sensitive alarms to assure that they are always morning people. Companies like Google are even going a step further. Currently they have filed several patents on a glucose sensing contact lens, that not only tracks blood glucose levels, but also connects to the internet and smart devices, as well as includes a heads up display for the person wearing it to see the data from the lens right on their eye!

Now imagine taking all of this telemetry data and being able to share or save it right to your Electronic Health Records so that your physician has access to it to help determine the best care to give. Some say it’s comforting, others think it’s a bit scary, but in either case, it is objectively valuable to the care provider on the other end. If you consider for example some of the tragedies we have seen befall collegiate athletes because they collapse during a game from an undiagnosed condition, could it not be argued that telemetry may have reported some objective data beforehand, even though the athlete wasn’t noticing any symptoms themselves?

These are some of the encouraging promises of big data and healthcare. People like to focus on the negative side sometimes; that the insurance companies may get this data somehow and then deny insurance based on the figures. But on the flip side, your physician could be getting the data and proactively address a potentially life threatening condition as well. The risk of the first may be more than negated by the benefit of the second.

The point is that telemetry has in fact been here for a while in the ER and ICU, but now, in the new connected environment, just like a video conferencing system connects doctors and patients remotely for appointments and check-ups, telemetry connects the biometric data your body produces day in and day out to a physical data log. This allows that same physician to prescribe better treatments during those appointments and even to proactively help you manage your health long term.

I heard someone on a medical program state that “the first person to live to 150 has already been born.” IT is definitely something to ponder, and given the state of medical technology, it doesn’t seem like an outlandish claim. I can’t help but think that telemetry will play a huge role in the active management of personal health, transforming the doctor patient relationship from one of “break-fix” to a true collaboration that gives us all the ability to live long and healthy lives.

Avidex AV is revolutionizing the way healthcare facilities and doctors are delivering care. Their 20 years of experience is being leveraged to drive down the cost of care while promoting positive healthcare outcomes. Is your organization looking for a new kind of technology partner? Connect with one of our Account Executives today to learn more.

Resources:

#1: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telemetry

#2: http://www.jacksonvilleu.com/resources/career/telemetry-nurse-job-description-salary/#.VruC_PkrLIU

#3: http://blog.avidex.com/next-stop-the-ioh-will-there-be-an-internet-of-healthcare/

#4: http://blog.avidex.com/the-doctors-watch-just-stole-my-medical-records-and-other-strange-tales/

#5: http://diatribe.org/google-secures-patent-glucose-sensing-contact-lens

Bob Higginbotham

About Bob Higginbotham

Bob Higginbotham, CTS-I, CTS-D, is the Avidex National Manager of Healthcare AV. Bob has spent his 30 year career in leadership positions in the AV industry including extensive design and build work in healthcare facilities. He owned and operated a successful AV business in Texas with multiple offices in several cities where he managed a staff of over 100 employees. Bob has served as a technical consultant for a major AV manufacturer, led the technical sales team for a national video conferencing provider and provided technology auditing services for several private education facilities. He has a unique working knowledge of audiovisual technology as well as multiple certifications in audio engineering, acoustics, AV design, CQT system commissioning and video transmission systems. Bob holds a BA in communications and has recently served as board chair for a large private school. He brings his years of technical knowledge and leadership experience to Avidex where he leads the national healthcare AV team. Contact Bob at bobh@avidexav.com

Are You Ready? The Tele-Med Act of 2015

dr on video conferenceMy parents taught me a few things growing up: open the door for all females (no matter the age); be polite; say “thank you”, “please” and “your welcome” when needed; and never talk religion and politics in social settings. Okay, so some of them I do all the time, and one of them, talking politics in a social setting, I will break today!

Having lived in rural areas for most of my adult life and having family in Montana, Idaho and Wisconsin, rural medical practices are an area near and dear to my heart. My family utilizes telemedicine with the great folks at Eastern Montana Telemedicine Network, and I hope to see a time when one of the fantastic doctors at the Billings Clinic will be able to work on my brother-in-law in Wisconsin when he slips in the boat an gashes his leg, gets a hook stick in his body or any of the dozens of accidents that occur on their family outings to the lakes.

Medicine is medicine, and if you graduated Med School and are a doctor, you should have every ability to treat your patients wherever they are – on vacation, winter living or hiking. Laws are in place for telemedicine as guidelines and the time has come to allow the people with the skills to do what they need to across state lines without interruption. Doctors are at a shortage, technology is not. Read on and let us know what you think.

Love her or hate her, Hillary Clinton may be your best friend if you are looking for someone to champion the telemedicine cause.

“Today, our health care system has changed dramatically, but it’s still too difficult for families in rural America to find quality, affordable health care…Telemedicine can help”.       -Hillary Clinton

If you aren’t aware, there is a bill going through congress titled H.R. 3081 or “The Tele-Med Act of 2015” that may just lower existing barriers to implementing telemedicine services, especially across state lines. Now, as it is a federal bill, it really only applies to Medicare currently, but it would set a precedent for other private insurance companies to follow and open up the boundaries that may currently prohibit them from offering services in neighboring states.

There is still a question as to whether this type of bill will be effective given that providers are licensed by their individual states to provide services, and if the provider would be required to be licensed in the state the patient resides in as well in order to legally provide medical care and advice, even by video conference. Breaking down the barriers to payment is one thing; navigating licensure and the 10th Amendment are another.

In any case, there are real shortages of care, especially in rural areas, and there are definite opportunities for health care providers to grow their practices by offering telemedicine services. According to a recent study, the services in the shortest supply in these areas seem to be those centered on primary care, mental health, and allied health professions.

The Tele-Med Act also lays out some proposed guidelines to help protect patients as well as practitioners form potential misdiagnoses and malpractice concerns.

Given these guidelines, here are 3 steps your practice can take to be ready to provide services given this new legislation passes.

  1. Electronic Health Records access and storage. Your practice will need to be able to manage and access electronic health records in a way that is compliant with HIPPA regulations on patient privacy. Part of the telemedicine legislation is that the care provider will need to have some prior knowledge of the patient and their pre-existing condition and treatments to responsibly recommend any treatment plan.
  2.  A proper teleconferencing system. Current regulations require that there be real time, interactive, 2 way communications between doctor and patient, assuring that a proper treatment plan can be arrived at while answering patient concerns and questions. Both Audio and Video capability are required. In order to assure reliable communication, an enterprise quality VTC system should be in place.
  3.  Store and Forward. The ability to capture images ahead of time and forward to a practitioner for evaluation can be a major asset in diagnosis. Recording sessions for future liability reasons is also a huge plus, and again HIPPA compliant encryption to protect patient data is a must for any data stored and/or forwarded.

Hopefully The Tele-Med Act of 2015 will fulfill its promise to allow service providers to serve patients across state lines without extensive licensure issues. If it does, telemedicine will certainly become an even bigger component to improved medical care. The question is will you be ready to capitalize on it?

For more than 20 years Avidex AV has provided innovative technologies that drive business outcomes for our clients. Is your organization looking for a new kind of technology partner? Connect with one of our Account Executives today to learn more.

Resources:

#1: http://www.memd.me/telemedicines-big-break/

#2: https://www.congress.gov/bill/114th-congress/house-bill/3081

#3: https://www.healthcarelawtoday.com/2015/08/26/will-the-tele-med-act-of-2015-really-change-licensure-rules/

#4: http://www.medicaid.gov/Medicaid-CHIP-Program-Information/By-Topics/Delivery-Systems/Telemedicine.html

Bob Higginbotham

About Bob Higginbotham

Bob Higginbotham, CTS-I, CTS-D, is the Avidex National Manager of Healthcare AV. Bob has spent his 30 year career in leadership positions in the AV industry including extensive design and build work in healthcare facilities. He owned and operated a successful AV business in Texas with multiple offices in several cities where he managed a staff of over 100 employees. Bob has served as a technical consultant for a major AV manufacturer, led the technical sales team for a national video conferencing provider and provided technology auditing services for several private education facilities. He has a unique working knowledge of audiovisual technology as well as multiple certifications in audio engineering, acoustics, AV design, CQT system commissioning and video transmission systems. Bob holds a BA in communications and has recently served as board chair for a large private school. He brings his years of technical knowledge and leadership experience to Avidex where he leads the national healthcare AV team. Contact Bob at bobh@avidexav.com

dr looking at monitor

Cracking the Code of State-of-the-Art Hospital Communication

A patient is rapidly transported into the ER.  He was stabilized by the paramedics on the way to the hospital and is immediately placed in the ICU.  The staff efficiently transfers him from the gurney to his bed and hooks him back up to the heart and respiratory monitors.  Then something goes wrong.  The patient’s heart stops.  The attending ER nurse rushes to her station, picks up her phone, and calls for a “code blue” response.

There’s only one problem, no one heard it because the emergency notification system was not designed properly.

In today’s world of high tech medicine, it’s easy to get overwhelmed with the advancements technology is bringing to our hospitals.  It really is an amazing time and something to behold.  However, the need to communicate effectively and efficiently is still at the core of providing essential care.

There are really two main parts to effective and efficient communication.  The first part is to make sure that all of the staff is speaking the same language.  Hospitals use a “color code” system to communicate different events within their facility and to trigger the proper response.  In the past many codes varied from facility to facility making that communication system inefficient and confusing at times.  To give a relevant true story:

“A hospital per diem nurse, employed by two different hospitals, began her shift to find that one of her patients had gone into cardiac arrest. She responded quickly by picking up the phone and announcing “code blue”. Within minutes she was surrounded by security guards and police officers with weapons in hand. To her dismay, the nurse was informed that code blue is a security alert in this facility. In her other place of employment, it means cardiac arrest. The correct team was quickly brought to the bedside and the patient recovered.”

This story illustrates two things.

First, it shows the need for some standardization in the color code system at least regionally for hospitals.  Hospitals in Washington, Oregon, and California are working on standardizing these codes for more effective communication and to minimize confusion for staff that may work in multiple facilities.

Second, even though the nurse gave the wrong code in the above example, something went right. 

The emergency notification and code announcement system worked.  The proper response for that hospital was implemented based on the code the nurse gave. This can only happen if the notification and code announcement system is designed properly.  So what are the core features of a state-of-the-art system?

Access

In order to be able to initiate a color code alert you first need a way to access the system.  Having multiple, convenient handsets or paging devices at nurse’s stations and other key areas assure the hospital staff will have the ability to communicate a color code and initiate a response.

Delivery

Once a code is initiated, there must be some way to communicate it to the rest of the staff for proper response.  The delivery system usually consists of public address (PA) speakers and sometimes may even include a method of alerting staff on personal mobile devices as well.

Coverage

A system that includes PA speakers must have the proper coverage.  The coverage is determined by the ceiling heights, area needing to be covered, and coverage pattern of the speakers.

Intelligibility

Even if everything above is all in place, the system is worthless if the staff cannot understand the codes being communicated.  Intelligibility is key and may be one of the trickier parts of the puzzle.  The Speech Transmission Index (STI) helps rate the intelligibility of speech delivered.  In a hospital environment, there is little opportunity to redesign the space or add acoustic treatments to the hard, sanitary surfaces.  For this reason having equipment that can be adjusted for background noise levels and audio frequency responses is dually important.

At the end of the day, hospitals rely on efficient and effective communication to provide exceptional care and ultimately save lives.  First get all the staff on the same page, then make sure you have a state-of-the-art emergency notification and code announcement system.

For more than 20 years Avidex AV has provided innovative technologies that drive business outcomes for our clients. Is your organization looking for a new kind of technology partner? Connect with one of our Account Executives today to learn more.

 

Resources:

#1:  http://www.hasc.org/resource/hospital-emergency-codes

#2:  http://www.wsha.org/files/82/codeseducationslides.ppt

#3:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speech_transmission_index

 

Bob Higginbotham

About Bob Higginbotham

Bob Higginbotham, CTS-I, CTS-D, is the Avidex National Manager of Healthcare AV. Bob has spent his 30 year career in leadership positions in the AV industry including extensive design and build work in healthcare facilities. He owned and operated a successful AV business in Texas with multiple offices in several cities where he managed a staff of over 100 employees. Bob has served as a technical consultant for a major AV manufacturer, led the technical sales team for a national video conferencing provider and provided technology auditing services for several private education facilities. He has a unique working knowledge of audiovisual technology as well as multiple certifications in audio engineering, acoustics, AV design, CQT system commissioning and video transmission systems. Bob holds a BA in communications and has recently served as board chair for a large private school. He brings his years of technical knowledge and leadership experience to Avidex where he leads the national healthcare AV team. Contact Bob at bobh@avidexav.com

polycom photo vid con

How is Video-as-a-Service (VaaS) helping the healthcare sector?

Video collaboration technology has been at the forefront of healthcare innovations recently. With the widespread adoption of telehealth and remote monitoring across the U.S and other countries worldwide, video is increasingly becoming a part of mainstream healthcare. The promise of the highest quality treatment, continuity of care, and round-the-clock medical assistance at lower cost than traditional healthcare practices make video contributions quite desirable. In this context, an article published on Polycom’s official blog discussed the scope of Video-as-a-Service (VaaS) in the modern healthcare sector taking into account, UK-based VaaS service provider, Imerja’s contributions in telehealthcare.

So what is VaaS?  It is a video conferencing solution that is fully-managed, hosted, and delivered on demand by a service provider. This mode of service ensures the highest quality video experience without having to incur infrastructure expenses. As a provider of simple, secure, and reliable VaaS services, Imerja extends remote monitoring capabilities to doctors and clinicians who can make critical decisions on treatment and care as efficiently as they would in a face-to-face scenario.

The article discusses various successful VaaS deployments driven by Imerja across hospitals and medical facilities in the U.K. Here is a sampling of them:

  • Video deployment in Alder Hey Hospital pediatric neurology department has eliminated the need for patients to travel in order to receive care from a specialist.
  • Lancashire Teaching Hospital’s renal department has enabled patients to perform dialysis at home under expert medical supervision and guidance via video conferencing.
  • Using video conferencing, Lancashire and Cumbria Telestroke Network have been able to save many patients’ lives through round-the-clock expert assistance, which can deliver post-stroke thrombolysis treatment.

Video-as-a-Service has improved treatment outcomes and patient experiences significantly, while helping hospitals save costs. Besides the cost savings, VaaS also provides the following benefits:

  • Enables better remote collaboration for faster response on critical medical conditions.
  • Takes treatment and care out of hospitals, providing 100% utilization rate across each hospital.
  • Prevents clinics from getting overcrowded and allowing effective space-utilization.
  • Allows patients in remote locations and rural areas with limited medical facilities to access quality healthcare at lower costs.

Providing both patients and healthcare providers with numerous benefits, VaaS has the power to transform the healthcare sector like never before by putting expert care within the reach of patients regardless of their location and ability to travel to a hospital or care center.

In what other ways do you think VaaS will extend the benefits of telemedicine, telehealth, and remote monitoring? We would love to hear your thoughts.

Bob Higginbotham

About Bob Higginbotham

Bob Higginbotham, CTS-I, CTS-D, is the Avidex National Manager of Healthcare AV. Bob has spent his 30 year career in leadership positions in the AV industry including extensive design and build work in healthcare facilities. He owned and operated a successful AV business in Texas with multiple offices in several cities where he managed a staff of over 100 employees. Bob has served as a technical consultant for a major AV manufacturer, led the technical sales team for a national video conferencing provider and provided technology auditing services for several private education facilities. He has a unique working knowledge of audiovisual technology as well as multiple certifications in audio engineering, acoustics, AV design, CQT system commissioning and video transmission systems. Bob holds a BA in communications and has recently served as board chair for a large private school. He brings his years of technical knowledge and leadership experience to Avidex where he leads the national healthcare AV team. Contact Bob at bobh@avidexav.com

Important Considerations for Picking a Telehealth Partner

practitioner-cart-lg-1At this point the growth of technology-enabled healthcare has become almost inevitable. With support from the largest industry associations including the American Medical Association, it is safe to say, telemedicine and telehealth are turning a corner in their adoption curve.

So now that the technology acceptance phase has reached critical mass, the next question that healthcare organizations may want to ask is, “Whom should we partner with for our telemedicine deployments?”

When it comes to technology, most who have been through any number of project lifecycles knows that it is rare that a project goes smooth from end to end. Problems can come about in the product selection, project management, training or even the post sales service.

In order to avoid problems throughout the project process, choosing the right partner is a critical consideration. With healthcare’s future leaning heavily on the integration and use of video collaboration, what should healthcare providers be looking for in a partner? We know how important partnership is, in fact, our friends at Polycom provide some interesting insights on the topic that we would love to share with our readers. Check out this article found on the Polycom “View” – The Future of Healthcare is about Collaboration.

What are the keys to successful partnerships for your organization?

At Avidex we believe in closely partnering with our healthcare clients to provide the best in telemedicine solutions as well as audio, video and other collaboration solutions. Connect with us to find out how we can help your organization with its technology needs.

Bob Higginbotham

About Bob Higginbotham

Bob Higginbotham, CTS-I, CTS-D, is the Avidex National Manager of Healthcare AV. Bob has spent his 30 year career in leadership positions in the AV industry including extensive design and build work in healthcare facilities. He owned and operated a successful AV business in Texas with multiple offices in several cities where he managed a staff of over 100 employees. Bob has served as a technical consultant for a major AV manufacturer, led the technical sales team for a national video conferencing provider and provided technology auditing services for several private education facilities. He has a unique working knowledge of audiovisual technology as well as multiple certifications in audio engineering, acoustics, AV design, CQT system commissioning and video transmission systems. Bob holds a BA in communications and has recently served as board chair for a large private school. He brings his years of technical knowledge and leadership experience to Avidex where he leads the national healthcare AV team. Contact Bob at bobh@avidexav.com

Enter The Operating Room Of The Future

operating room of the futureJust how much will technology invade the operating room of the future? In a world where robots are performing highly complicated surgical procedures; the answer is quite a bit.

How about beyond the operating table and into the surrounding environment? How much is technology going to impact the immediate surroundings of the patient? For a long time we have seen screens and monitoring devices, but will consumerization and high tech gadgets find their way into the ER?

According to this provocative piece in Fast Company – Inside The Operating Room Of The Future, Where Doctors Use Google Glass, the future of the Operating Room is here. In an exploration of Kaiser Permanente’s Garfield Innovation Center in California, the use of Telepresence, Interactive Digital Monitors and even Google Glass is already being put into production. Well, not quite production, but darn close.

At the featured facility Doctors are operating on “Humanoids” in these high tech environments where the focus is the most advanced technology and the perfection of the medical checklist with the expectation that interactive technology can reduce human error and improve doctor performance.

At Avidex we provide leading healthcare facilities with the very best technologies including telepresence and high-tech monitors that can be utilized throughout healthcare facilities. If you want to learn more about how we can help, get in touch with one of our account representatives. We look forward to hearing from you.

Jim Colquhoun

About Jim Colquhoun

Jim Colquhoun is the Chief Technologist for Avidex. Jim brings an exceptional record of management and operational experience, as well as expertise in the design and integration of communications, AV, and broadcast systems. Jim can be reached at jcolquhoun@avidexav.com

Forward Thinking Trends Driving Video Content Management In Healthcare

Practitioner-Cart_Patient-Room_01a  Practitioner-Cart_Exam-Room_02a

This past week the American Telemedicine Association had their annual meeting and convention in Baltimore where a wide array of the leaders in the healthcare technology space assembled to collaborate with healthcare technology managers on what is next for Telemedicine.

Reportedly, one of the hot topics this year was the application of Telemedicine as a vehicle for not only patient care, but for wellness and preventative medicine. While preventative medicine has been a hot topic in the healthcare industry for a long time, the application of telemedicine to help facilitate this has been less clear.

This year from the show our partners at Polycom shared some terrific applications for not only video conferencing, but for video content management as part of a telemedicine practice to drive initiatives in wellness and prevention.

In a recent post from the event, 3 Trends in Video-Based Medical Education – Polycom shares 3 specific applications that are leading the way for video content management adoption within the telemedicine ecosystem. These applications include Patient Education, Practitioner Education and Population Management.

Think about how valuable a library of informative and educational videos could be for doctors, nurses, patients, and loved ones dealing with a plethora of healthcare related topics?

For healthcare organizations interested in learning more about how video can be captured, organized and made available for your patients and staff, the team at Avidex is pleased to help. Get in touch to find out what is out there that can push your organization forward.

Bob Higginbotham

About Bob Higginbotham

Bob Higginbotham, CTS-I, CTS-D, is the Avidex National Manager of Healthcare AV. Bob has spent his 30 year career in leadership positions in the AV industry including extensive design and build work in healthcare facilities. He owned and operated a successful AV business in Texas with multiple offices in several cities where he managed a staff of over 100 employees. Bob has served as a technical consultant for a major AV manufacturer, led the technical sales team for a national video conferencing provider and provided technology auditing services for several private education facilities. He has a unique working knowledge of audiovisual technology as well as multiple certifications in audio engineering, acoustics, AV design, CQT system commissioning and video transmission systems. Bob holds a BA in communications and has recently served as board chair for a large private school. He brings his years of technical knowledge and leadership experience to Avidex where he leads the national healthcare AV team. Contact Bob at bobh@avidexav.com