Category Archives: Supplier Partner News

Aligning Outcomes

A couple months back we took a look at how important patient satisfaction is becoming in healthcare. Payments are transferring to a model that evaluates outcomes and requires that the patient is satisfied with their care in order to receive the full amount billed for the services rendered.64895307_s

One potential problem for providers however, is trying to hit a satisfaction target that varies from patient to patient. Two patients could receive identical treatment for identical issues from the same practitioner and those two people may rate their experiences completely differently.

The challenge is that patients bring their own situational implications with them. Each patient has a different history with a variety of providers, and those experiences shape the expectations of the patient. If there’s one thing that is certain about satisfaction, it is that it’s implicitly tied to expectation. If a visit to the ER, Urgent Care, or even a well check don’t measure up to the bar that the patient has already set in their head prior to their visit, you will inevitably end up with a dissatisfied patient.

Given all this, it may seem impossible to even institute a program that would address the varying levels of patient expectations that healthcare providers will encounter. However, there is in fact a way to start the process.

The best way to assure that you are meeting a patient’s expectations is to be involved in setting them in the first place.

A healthcare provider that sets up a system where there is proactive communication and education with the patient on their condition, the steps being taken to treat the condition, and the range of outcomes that the patient can expect, allows the provider to set expectations for the upcoming stages of their healthcare journey.

“Gone — in many ways thankfully — are the days of the paternalist model of medicine where “doctor knows best” is the tagline. Today, patients are increasingly empowered to take part in their own healthcare journeys through access to online information. But they can only do that effectively when their decisions are guided by advanced educational sources.”

– Dr. Linda Grigis

Given that many online resources provide incorrect information to patients, some estimates say well under 50% of medical websites provide correct treatment recommendations, there is a unique opportunity for providers to invest in and curate their own patient education resources. These resources can be leveraged online before upcoming visits, during examinations or consultations on screens in the examination rooms, and even made available during extended hospitalization through the flat panels in the patient rooms. Education empowers patients to become active participants in their healthcare decisions, and people who make educated choices typically take more shared personal responsibility for the outcome, meaning they may be less likely to place all the blame on the practitioner if the preferred outcome is not immediately achieved.

At the end of the day, patient education systems can go a long way to set proper expectations and empower patients to make better, informed choices about their care, improving patient satisfaction. As an added benefit, these same systems also help educate patients on aftercare instructions and future preventative measures to take to avoid recurrence of the condition or readmission to the hospital, which can also be costly to providers and detrimental to long term patient satisfaction and loyalty.

Treating patients like partners, opening up lines of communication and education, and aligning the provider’s and patient’s preferred outcomes are all necessary to be successful in today’s healthcare environment.

Avidex AV is revolutionizing the way healthcare facilities and doctors are delivering care. Their 20 years of experience is being leveraged to drive down the cost of care while promoting positive healthcare outcomes. Is your organization looking for a new kind of technology partner? Connect with one of our Account Executives today to learn more.

Resources:

#1: https://www.qualtrics.com/blog/customer-expectations/

#2: http://blog.avidex.com/the-role-of-technology-in-patient-satisfaction/

#3: https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/accuracy-of-medical-information-on-the-internet/

#4: http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2016/12/cme-isnt-today-align-empower-patient-outcomes.html

 

Carey Cox

About Carey Cox

Carey Cox has spent his 17 year career in various roles within the health care industry including sales, consulting, and operations management. Carey has been involved in a number of capital system sales roles including life safety, infant security, audio-visual, and clinical education. He had operational oversight of two Baylor pain management centers and served on various committees for Baylor Health Care System in Dallas. His internal knowledge of health care operations, his leadership experience and his ability to build and strengthen relationships give him a unique insight into clinical workflow and process throughput. Carey holds a Master’s Degree in Health Care Administration and also volunteers in a mentoring program for young adults entering into the workforce. During his tenure at TeleHealth Services, he has been instrumental in expanding the TeleHealth footprint in Dallas-Ft Worth (Methodist Health System) and Houston (CHI St. Luke’s Health and Memorial Hermann) health care markets.

Misery Loves Company

We’ve all heard the term “Misery loves company.” It is typically used in a way that suggests that people who are unhappy like to be with other people that are unhappy or that people who are miserable wish others ill will. But what if “misery loves company” meant something else 33827079 - patient using digital tablet while reclining on hospital bedcompletely, and that understanding the phrase better could generate better patient outcomes in healthcare?

The answer to the “misery loves company” riddle, may have just been solved. Recent research has shown that a group of brain cells called “mirror neurons” may play a key role. They are activated when we experience emotions ourselves, but also when we watch others go through an emotional state. The vicarious experience actually makes the mirror neurons fire in our brains creating a similar emotional state in us. It is the physiological manifestation of empathy, and it also helps explain why film and plays may be so cathartic and riveting.

From a healthcare perspective, knowing this is a huge benefit, especially from a facility’s visitors policy perspective. Creating ways for patients to have positive interactions with their friends and loved ones can have a direct impact on their health, recovery, and ultimately their happiness.

“So during and after a visit from a loving and cheerful friend or relation, mirror neurons will stir similar positive feelings in the brain of the person in the hospital bed, lifting their spirits and making them feel better.”

In fact, Dr Matthew Ratcliffe of Durham University goes even further to assert that,

By being with someone who has a smiling face — such as a hospital visitor — mirror neurons motivate a similar response in our own brain, leading us to make a similar gesture and even directing us towards a similar emotional reaction.”

So creating ways for patients to interact with family and friends and lowering the barriers to those interactions can have an impact on the patient’s happiness as well as how they perceive their medical condition. Given that a happy patient is a satisfied patient, and currently more and more healthcare payments are being tied to patient satisfaction and positive outcomes, it is to the healthcare provider’s advantage to find ways to lower the barrier to these interactions. Many hospitals have already expanded their visitation hours to better accommodate patients’ family and friends. Chris Clarke, who oversees the Tennessee Hospital Association’s Center for Patient Safety relays that “There is a renewed focus on patient-focused care that means better engaging with patients’ families.”

Visitation policies only go so far as they only apply to family and friends who can physically make it to the physical location. However the absence of a loved one can likewise have a negative effect on the patient’s recovery.

“Meanwhile, friends failing to turn up for a visit could actually be bad for the patient.

Not only are they deprived of the benefits of loving contact but their feelings of rejection activate the very areas of the brain that generate the sting of physical pain.”

-Daniel Goleman, author of Social Intelligence: The New Science Of Human Relationships

This is where technology can play a key role. High definition video conferencing systems, installed in patient rooms, offer another way for patients and their friends and family to connect. Given that the mirror neurons respond to observing the emotions of a patient’s visitor, the video component is actually key in generating a positive emotional state.

Video conferencing provides the experience of an in person visit, eliminates the awkwardness that can sometimes accompany a traditional phone call, and most importantly, can leave the patient feeling just as happy as they would in the case of an in-person visit due to the brain’s physiological reaction.

The benefits of video conferencing in remote patient diagnosis, increased access to specialists, and to higher quality care in rural areas have been well known for some time. However, there is an additional benefit to these systems in the case of providing communication between patients and loved ones in their time of need, resulting in better patient satisfaction.

It seems that in a scientific sense, misery does indeed love company, not to spread the negative, but rather to replace it with the positive.

HealthAV is revolutionizing the way healthcare facilities and doctors are delivering care. TeleHealth Services and Avidex divisions of Telerent Leasing Corporation, are pleased to announce the emergence of HealthAV, excellence in Healthcare Professional AV design and system integration services. Connect with one of our Account Executives today to learn more.

healthcare

Resources:

#1: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-410783/The-proof-visiting-people-hospital-really-does-good.html

#2: http://www.forbes.com/sites/brucejapsen/2013/07/02/patient-satisfaction-hits-physician-pay/#53b7241e133f

 

#3: http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/healthcare/hospitals-expand-visiting-hours-to-accommodate-patients-families

Bob Higginbotham

About Bob Higginbotham

Bob Higginbotham, CTS-I, CTS-D, is the Avidex National Manager of Healthcare AV. Bob has spent his 30 year career in leadership positions in the AV industry including extensive design and build work in healthcare facilities. He owned and operated a successful AV business in Texas with multiple offices in several cities where he managed a staff of over 100 employees. Bob has served as a technical consultant for a major AV manufacturer, led the technical sales team for a national video conferencing provider and provided technology auditing services for several private education facilities. He has a unique working knowledge of audiovisual technology as well as multiple certifications in audio engineering, acoustics, AV design, CQT system commissioning and video transmission systems. Bob holds a BA in communications and has recently served as board chair for a large private school. He brings his years of technical knowledge and leadership experience to Avidex where he leads the national healthcare AV team. Contact Bob at bobh@avidexav.com

“Are You Not Entertained?”

If you’ve ever woken up in the middle of the night or found yourself home from work sick, you know how difficult it can be to find something42402604 - senior female patient watching tv in hospital bed worthwhile on television. The experience is usually marked by listless channel surfing before you settle on a movie you’ve seen 18 times only to realize that every 10 minutes the movie pauses to launch into a 5 minute commercial break. At home fortunately you are not confined to one room or a bed, and you have access to other entertainment options like a favorite DVD or book. Imagine however you find yourself in a hospital bed, connected to medical equipment with nothing to focus your attention on but the TV hanging in the corner. In the past, this may have been a source of patient anxiety, but in today’s high tech world, it doesn’t have to be that way.

The modern medical facility has a great number of options when it comes to providing an “at home” entertainment experience to their patients. Gone are the days when an off-air antenna or a stack of cable boxes in the basement provided a few channels of content to patient rooms over coax. The patient entertainment experience can now be highly customizable and individualized. This allows the healthcare facility to offer more patient amenities similar to the hospitality industry.

An investment in a comprehensive visual communications solution provides the following advantages:

High Definition Programming- Nothing says, “I’m not at home”, more than a 19” TV up in the corner playing a static ridden rerun of The Brady Bunch. HD displays combined with HD content are familiar and a default patient expectation.

Diverse Channel Line Ups- Whether you choose IPTV, Direct TV, or cable, new systems allow the healthcare provider to create customized channel line-ups that best reflect the needs of their diverse patient population.

Customized Content- Need to share menu information around hospital meal options, general material on hospital offerings, or important accreditation communications? Facilities can create their own channels to share this news and more.

Patient-Specific Information- Provide easy, on-demand access to information, after-care instructions, and discharge information that patients can review at their own pace and frequency and create a digital record for your hospital files for reduction of liability and accreditation purposes. Hospitals can automate the delivery of this information by interfacing with their EMR, providing another way to leverage their existing investment.

On-Demand Entertainment- No more starting a movie in the middle and then watching an equal amount of commercials. Choose from an extended library of movies and shows just like you would at home.

Relaxation- Nothing provides a more optimal healing environment more than your soothing music and calming imagery. Modern systems offer access to this programming because a reduction of stress is shown to promote positive medical outcomes.

Not every patient has an iPad at their side and even if they did, the WiFi would have a hard time keeping up. A well planned, integrated visual communications system allows healthcare facilities to leverage existing investments in healthcare televisions and infrastructure, while providing a more reliable and universally accessible way for patients to pass the time while hospitalized. Add in the benefits of providing on-demand patient education, and you will be providing an experience that also reduces readmissions and empowers your patients in the recovery process. It’s a winning solution for both the facility and the patient.

Avidex AV is revolutionizing the way healthcare facilities and doctors are delivering care. Their 20 years of experience is being leveraged to drive down the cost of care while promoting positive healthcare outcomes. Is your organization looking for a new kind of technology partner? Connect with one of our Account Executives today to learn more.

Resources:

#1: https://www.quora.com/Why-do-hospitals-feel-like-prisons-sometimes

#2: http://blog.avidex.com/from-hospital-to-hospitality-how-does-your-facility-rate/

#3: http://www.telehealth.com/television-solutions/patient-programming

#4: http://blog.avidex.com/how-healthy-is-your-technology-experience/

Jeff Miller

About Jeff Miller

Jeff has been working in the professional AV integration industry for over twenty years. During that time he has served as Designer, Project Manager and/or Account Executive for hundreds of projects. As an Account Executive at Avidex, he specializes in Medical, Education, and Control Rooms. He can be reached at jmiller@avidex.com

Are You Putting your Patients on Blast?

You are already a bit nervous. You are having a very personal medical issue that you find a bit embarrassing. In fact, you are even a little nervous about talking to your doctor about it. You sit quietly in the examination room after your vitals have been taken, awaiting the arrival of the physician. As you sit on the examination table, you hear the physician say “hello”. You quickly realize however that he has not entered your room but the one next door. You can’t help but listen in as he discusses your neighbor’s maladies in great detail. Your curiosity turns to apprehension as you realize that if you can hear them, then they will be able to overhear your conversation with the physician as well.33824120 - female doctor sitting with patient on hospital bed

If you have ever been to the doctor to discuss a sensitive medical issue, you may identify with the anxiety of the patient above. How would your anxiety level and perception of the doctor’s office change knowing that everyone was able to hear what you assumed was going to be a private conversation protected by the doctor patient relationship?

There has been a lot of discussion in healthcare and on this blog about the Health Information Portability and Privacy Act (HIPPA) and its implications with regard to security of patients’ electronic data and communications. However, HIPPA covers all healthcare communications, including oral communications. That communication could be between healthcare professionals or between doctor’s and their patients, and in all cases, HIPPA privacy rules apply.

Protecting oral communications can be tricky, and some may argue that it is difficult at best. HIPPA specifically refers to communications breaches that can be “reasonably prevented”, which is a rather vague standard to meet. However there are some simple solutions and steps to take that can definitely meet that recommendation.

Healthcare providers that are designing and constructing their own facilities can easily promote construction techniques that minimize something called the Sound Transmission Class, or STC. There are multiple techniques that can be used in construction that involve everything from decoupling sheetrock from studs, building interior wall all the way to the hard cap ceiling as opposed to just above the acoustic grid, and using acoustic treatment materials on walls and other hard surfaces.

For smaller healthcare providers and independent physicians building a new facility from the ground up, or doing an extended tenant improvement to an existing space is just not possible, feasible, or cost effective. In these cases all is not lost. Many turn to technology as a viable and less expensive option to create speech privacy. They do this in two different ways via a sound system. One way is very intuitive but the other may be something you are unfamiliar with.

Many healthcare facilities utilize music in waiting rooms and examination rooms. The purpose is two-fold. First, there is a psychological calming effect proven to be associated with certain pieces or styles of music, and putting patients in a state of relaxation can have a positive impact on the quality of care. Secondly, having a base level of music in the background can potentially obscure other conversations in nearby areas that may have been easily heard if the space was completely quiet. An added bonus of these type of sound systems is that they can also be used with local paging systems to call physicians, nurses, or even patients.

There is another type of audio system that can also be used increase speech privacy and it typically goes unnoticed. In many cases having music in an area where a doctor may be trying to evaluate a condition or explain a delicate treatment to a patient can be counterproductive. IN these cases a sound masking system may be your best bet.

A sound masking system uses speakers that typically face upward into the ceiling spaces. Instead of playing music, they play a sound similar to airflow. This base level of white noise acts as a barrier to other sounds traveling through the same space and masks them. It reduces sound transfer and the intelligibility of speech and as such, increases privacy. Think of it as a pair of noise cancelling headphones for your healthcare spaces.

At the end of the day, as healthcare providers, you want your patients to feel safe and comfortable with their doctor patient interactions. Investing in technology to increase speech privacy not only helps you avoid potential fines that may result from a HIPPA audit, but more importantly protects your patients and makes them feel secure and at ease with you as their healthcare provider. Isn’t that really the end goal anyway?

Avidex AV is revolutionizing the way healthcare facilities and doctors are delivering care. Their 20 years of experience is being leveraged to drive down the cost of care while promoting positive healthcare outcomes. Is your organization looking for a new kind of technology partner? Connect with one of our Account Executives today to learn more.

Resources:

#1: http://bok.ahima.org/doc?oid=59139#.V8RvGPkrLIV

#2: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sound_transmission_class

Bob Higginbotham

About Bob Higginbotham

Bob Higginbotham, CTS-I, CTS-D, is the Avidex National Manager of Healthcare AV. Bob has spent his 30 year career in leadership positions in the AV industry including extensive design and build work in healthcare facilities. He owned and operated a successful AV business in Texas with multiple offices in several cities where he managed a staff of over 100 employees. Bob has served as a technical consultant for a major AV manufacturer, led the technical sales team for a national video conferencing provider and provided technology auditing services for several private education facilities. He has a unique working knowledge of audiovisual technology as well as multiple certifications in audio engineering, acoustics, AV design, CQT system commissioning and video transmission systems. Bob holds a BA in communications and has recently served as board chair for a large private school. He brings his years of technical knowledge and leadership experience to Avidex where he leads the national healthcare AV team. Contact Bob at bobh@avidexav.com

polycom photo vid con

How is Video-as-a-Service (VaaS) helping the healthcare sector?

Video collaboration technology has been at the forefront of healthcare innovations recently. With the widespread adoption of telehealth and remote monitoring across the U.S and other countries worldwide, video is increasingly becoming a part of mainstream healthcare. The promise of the highest quality treatment, continuity of care, and round-the-clock medical assistance at lower cost than traditional healthcare practices make video contributions quite desirable. In this context, an article published on Polycom’s official blog discussed the scope of Video-as-a-Service (VaaS) in the modern healthcare sector taking into account, UK-based VaaS service provider, Imerja’s contributions in telehealthcare.

So what is VaaS?  It is a video conferencing solution that is fully-managed, hosted, and delivered on demand by a service provider. This mode of service ensures the highest quality video experience without having to incur infrastructure expenses. As a provider of simple, secure, and reliable VaaS services, Imerja extends remote monitoring capabilities to doctors and clinicians who can make critical decisions on treatment and care as efficiently as they would in a face-to-face scenario.

The article discusses various successful VaaS deployments driven by Imerja across hospitals and medical facilities in the U.K. Here is a sampling of them:

  • Video deployment in Alder Hey Hospital pediatric neurology department has eliminated the need for patients to travel in order to receive care from a specialist.
  • Lancashire Teaching Hospital’s renal department has enabled patients to perform dialysis at home under expert medical supervision and guidance via video conferencing.
  • Using video conferencing, Lancashire and Cumbria Telestroke Network have been able to save many patients’ lives through round-the-clock expert assistance, which can deliver post-stroke thrombolysis treatment.

Video-as-a-Service has improved treatment outcomes and patient experiences significantly, while helping hospitals save costs. Besides the cost savings, VaaS also provides the following benefits:

  • Enables better remote collaboration for faster response on critical medical conditions.
  • Takes treatment and care out of hospitals, providing 100% utilization rate across each hospital.
  • Prevents clinics from getting overcrowded and allowing effective space-utilization.
  • Allows patients in remote locations and rural areas with limited medical facilities to access quality healthcare at lower costs.

Providing both patients and healthcare providers with numerous benefits, VaaS has the power to transform the healthcare sector like never before by putting expert care within the reach of patients regardless of their location and ability to travel to a hospital or care center.

In what other ways do you think VaaS will extend the benefits of telemedicine, telehealth, and remote monitoring? We would love to hear your thoughts.

Bob Higginbotham

About Bob Higginbotham

Bob Higginbotham, CTS-I, CTS-D, is the Avidex National Manager of Healthcare AV. Bob has spent his 30 year career in leadership positions in the AV industry including extensive design and build work in healthcare facilities. He owned and operated a successful AV business in Texas with multiple offices in several cities where he managed a staff of over 100 employees. Bob has served as a technical consultant for a major AV manufacturer, led the technical sales team for a national video conferencing provider and provided technology auditing services for several private education facilities. He has a unique working knowledge of audiovisual technology as well as multiple certifications in audio engineering, acoustics, AV design, CQT system commissioning and video transmission systems. Bob holds a BA in communications and has recently served as board chair for a large private school. He brings his years of technical knowledge and leadership experience to Avidex where he leads the national healthcare AV team. Contact Bob at bobh@avidexav.com

How To Share Documents Wirelessly To Your Presentation

easy buttonCommunication without Boundaries is the ultimate achievement for any group trying to make the experience of meetings seamless, wireless, unobtrusive and simple.  Unlike the commercials on television, the big “EASY” button rarely exists in conference rooms and meeting spaces. However, some companies have tried relentlessly to make that easy button appear with the help of wireless connectivity for document sharing and collaboration in meeting spaces.

Products like Christie’s Brio, Barco’s Click-To-Share, Crestron’s AM-100 and others have made the art of information sharing as easy as plug, click and share.

Hospitals are inundated with meetings from outside visitors and inside users trying to pass information to other meeting participants. By allowing these simple document sharing devices to be used in meeting rooms, less involvement from over-worked, understaffed departments like IT or AV allow for cost savings and reduced time wasting. Meetings can start without the use of cables, turning on external devices and/or switching units to get a PowerPoint or document on the screen.

Document sharing is a critical element of successful collaboration, training and meetings in today’s professional world. Participants need to be able to transmit important information to each other so that they can work together on projects, just like companies need to be able to present information about their products and services to potential customers.

The Benefits Of Wireless Document Sharing

When you have the ability to send documents to presentation systems without any kind of wired connection, it opens up your presentation capabilities. Guest speakers or presenters can come in and give presentations without any kind of concern about having the right cables to link into your network. This feature is especially valuable for institutions that have multiple locations in different areas that use different kinds of technology. Many of the devices used for wireless presentations can support multiple users at once, which enhances collaborative abilities and makes presentation areas less cluttered with wires, cables and devices.

Devices That Support Wireless Document Sharing

Sharing documents wirelessly for presentation systems requires the use of a piece of hardware that integrates these devices into a local network. If you are going to be using one of these devices, it is important that you pick one that gives you the right kind of functionality and fits into your company budget. Two popular options for sharing documents wirelessly are the Christie Brio series and the Crestron AM-100.

Christie-Brio-ProductChristie Brio

The Brio comes in three models: the Enterprise, Team, and Team+. The differences between these solutions vary depending on how many users need access to the device and whether or not you want your device on your company wireless network. Only the Enterprise is able to integrate into your company network. Christie’s Brio solution offers responsive content layouts, a simple session management interface, and the ability to connect to audio systems in a meeting or conference room.

Crestron AM-100

Crestron’s AM-100 connects to your local wireless network and then supports connections from a multitude of devices, including iOS and Android smartphones and tablets. The AM-100 offers quad view mode, which allows four screens to be viewed at once, as well as remote viewing, which lets users view presentations in their web browsers. The AM-100 also comes with wired ports as well, which can be helpful if you run into wireless issues.

Both of these devices make an excellent solution for sharing documents wirelessly for presentation systems. To decide which interface is best for your needs, think about your budget as well as the specific requirements that you may have, which will help you make wireless document sharing easy at your office.

 

 

Bob Higginbotham

About Bob Higginbotham

Bob Higginbotham, CTS-I, CTS-D, is the Avidex National Manager of Healthcare AV. Bob has spent his 30 year career in leadership positions in the AV industry including extensive design and build work in healthcare facilities. He owned and operated a successful AV business in Texas with multiple offices in several cities where he managed a staff of over 100 employees. Bob has served as a technical consultant for a major AV manufacturer, led the technical sales team for a national video conferencing provider and provided technology auditing services for several private education facilities. He has a unique working knowledge of audiovisual technology as well as multiple certifications in audio engineering, acoustics, AV design, CQT system commissioning and video transmission systems. Bob holds a BA in communications and has recently served as board chair for a large private school. He brings his years of technical knowledge and leadership experience to Avidex where he leads the national healthcare AV team. Contact Bob at bobh@avidexav.com

Forward Thinking Trends Driving Video Content Management In Healthcare

Practitioner-Cart_Patient-Room_01a  Practitioner-Cart_Exam-Room_02a

This past week the American Telemedicine Association had their annual meeting and convention in Baltimore where a wide array of the leaders in the healthcare technology space assembled to collaborate with healthcare technology managers on what is next for Telemedicine.

Reportedly, one of the hot topics this year was the application of Telemedicine as a vehicle for not only patient care, but for wellness and preventative medicine. While preventative medicine has been a hot topic in the healthcare industry for a long time, the application of telemedicine to help facilitate this has been less clear.

This year from the show our partners at Polycom shared some terrific applications for not only video conferencing, but for video content management as part of a telemedicine practice to drive initiatives in wellness and prevention.

In a recent post from the event, 3 Trends in Video-Based Medical Education – Polycom shares 3 specific applications that are leading the way for video content management adoption within the telemedicine ecosystem. These applications include Patient Education, Practitioner Education and Population Management.

Think about how valuable a library of informative and educational videos could be for doctors, nurses, patients, and loved ones dealing with a plethora of healthcare related topics?

For healthcare organizations interested in learning more about how video can be captured, organized and made available for your patients and staff, the team at Avidex is pleased to help. Get in touch to find out what is out there that can push your organization forward.

Bob Higginbotham

About Bob Higginbotham

Bob Higginbotham, CTS-I, CTS-D, is the Avidex National Manager of Healthcare AV. Bob has spent his 30 year career in leadership positions in the AV industry including extensive design and build work in healthcare facilities. He owned and operated a successful AV business in Texas with multiple offices in several cities where he managed a staff of over 100 employees. Bob has served as a technical consultant for a major AV manufacturer, led the technical sales team for a national video conferencing provider and provided technology auditing services for several private education facilities. He has a unique working knowledge of audiovisual technology as well as multiple certifications in audio engineering, acoustics, AV design, CQT system commissioning and video transmission systems. Bob holds a BA in communications and has recently served as board chair for a large private school. He brings his years of technical knowledge and leadership experience to Avidex where he leads the national healthcare AV team. Contact Bob at bobh@avidexav.com

Federation of State Medical Boards Recognize Telemedicine As In-Person Consult

Photo from Vidyo Brandon Berg sid I could use     Vidyo_Mercy_Image_2_web

For as long as high quality video conferencing has been available the healthcare industry has seen potential.

The discussions around telemedicine have long been met with a certain stagnation as the healthcare world, which is riddled with regulation has seen one challenge after another in gaining wide adoption of the invaluable capabilities that telemedicine can bring.

One of the long known challenges of adoption has been the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB) who until April of 2014 did not recognize video consultations (Telemedicine) as equal to an in person consult. With this change of policy by the FSMB the doors have been opened up for telemedicine and what it can do to help connect doctors and patients more readily using telemedicine.

In an article featured on Forbes Vidyo Gets The Jump On Next Generation Telemedicine: But What About Cisco Systems And Polycom? by one notable healthcare technology analyst, he believes that this change will really open the flood gates for healthcare systems who have been considering adoption of expansion of healthcare based video consultations.

One of the other important ideas noticed in the article was the importance of a streamlined software that allows for easy implementation of telemedicine to standard mobile device operating systems such as Apple’s iOS and Google’s Android.

Companies like Vidyo have shown leadership in this development, but Cisco and Polycom are also obvious contenders for taking a leadership role in this space.

What is becoming more and more apparent is that Telemedicine is finding its way into more and more healthcare systems. The ultimate technology winner is still to be determined and that is why at Avidex we partner with many of the leading telemedicine solution providers; so we can focus on the need of our partners and then deploy accordingly.

Is your organization adopting or exploring telemedicine? We’d love to help you in your journey from information gathering through deployment. Just let us know how we can help? Visit our website at www.avidexav.com.

To read the article provided by Forbes click here.

 

Joel Harris

About Joel Harris

Joel Harris brings invaluable insight to the Avidex team in his role as CEO, with years of experience leading national technology, healthcare and business organizations. You can reach Joel at jharris@avidexav.com

Woman on computer with dr image

Healthcare Shifts From Patient Model to Consumption Model

In a world where people are more informed than ever before the patterns of purchase behavior are changing and they are affecting not just the way we buy products, but the way we consume services as well.

Healthcare is also feeling this shift as patients move away from the “patient mindset” and become consumers or users of healthcare.

Technology is leading this transition, as we are now more acutely monitoring our health with wearable devices that track our exercise and food consumption. Mobile applications and patient portals that give us direct access to information about ourselves that we could not have imagined just a few years ago augment these devices.

Other technologies such as telehealth and video conferencing that are completely changing the healthcare experience can be found in the meeting spaces and operating rooms throughout hospitals and healthcare facilities.  Such technologies make it possible for patients and doctors to connect faster and doctors and specialists to collaborate in real time to solve important health care problems.

In this article “A Consumer View of Healthcare Reforms and IoE driven Healthcare IT Innovations” Cisco goes deep into how “The Internet of Everything” is changing the entire consumption experience of healthcare services. Learn more by reading the article and if you are interested in changing the way your organization communicates check out more from AvidexAV. To read the full Cisco article click here.

Bob Higginbotham

About Bob Higginbotham

Bob Higginbotham, CTS-I, CTS-D, is the Avidex National Manager of Healthcare AV. Bob has spent his 30 year career in leadership positions in the AV industry including extensive design and build work in healthcare facilities. He owned and operated a successful AV business in Texas with multiple offices in several cities where he managed a staff of over 100 employees. Bob has served as a technical consultant for a major AV manufacturer, led the technical sales team for a national video conferencing provider and provided technology auditing services for several private education facilities. He has a unique working knowledge of audiovisual technology as well as multiple certifications in audio engineering, acoustics, AV design, CQT system commissioning and video transmission systems. Bob holds a BA in communications and has recently served as board chair for a large private school. He brings his years of technical knowledge and leadership experience to Avidex where he leads the national healthcare AV team. Contact Bob at bobh@avidexav.com