Author Archives: Jim Scalise

Jim Scalise

About Jim Scalise

Jim is the Avidex Systems Integrated Group Manager and has been in the AV industry for more than 20 years. Jim oversees and manages the integrated systems team and is directly involved in design, application, project and field engineering as well as sales, service and installation support. Contact Jim at jscalise@avidexav.com

Journey Mapping, Technology, and the Patient Experience

 

Journey mapping has become a very popular exercise across several industries, including manufacturing, services and yes, you guessed it, healthcare. Journey mapping is much more than a buzzword or a fad however. It is an essential part of developing a superior patient experience. In fact, your practice or facility may have already or be in the process of creating a map of your patient journey.

As a quick overview for the uninitiated-

“A customer journey map tells the story of the customer’s experience: from initial contact, through the process of engagement and into a long-term relationship. It may focus on a particular part of the story or give an overview of the entire experience.”

Journey maps are used to improve processes and create touchpoints that assure patients are satisfied with their care both throughout their journey and with the end result of their care. Given that the performance of a healthcare provider is now evaluated based on patient outcomes (70%) and patient satisfaction (30%) and that payments are dependent on performance in both areas, and all of a sudden a journey map can have a huge ROI.

A patient journey map has two lines. One line is the patient’s expected level of satisfaction. This is the base level of expectation of what they feel a normal patient experience entails. The second line contours the experience itself. This line typically goes up and down throughout the patient journey, many times above the level of expectation, and many times dropping below gradually, or sometimes suddenly before returning. These are called cliffs, and many times the patient careens off of these cliffs into a ravine of dissatisfaction.

This is where healthcare technology can play a huge role. Technology can create bridges across these canyons in the patient experience, keeping the patient above the line of satisfaction and helping to assure they are satisfied with their care.

If you read this blog regularly, you know that it relays many ways that technology improves the delivery and quality of healthcare. Over the next couple of posts we will link many of those technologies to the patient journey, addressing how the cliffs and valleys can be leveled out by implementing technology properly in your practice or facility.

The three major portions of the patient journey that will be analyzed are Admissions and the Waiting Room, Inpatient Care, and After Care and Follow Up. We’ll explore the cliffs that many patient experiences have and then how specific technologies can help bridge those gaps.

The technology in question does not always have to be patient facing either. There are many technologies that are visitor or provider-facing that can intimately affect the patient’s journey and their satisfaction.

At the end of the day, a patient journey map identifies as many opportunities as it does issues. It helps providers to make sure they are aligning outcomes with their patients. So stay tuned for the next post on how to capitalize on those opportunities through the use of innovative technologies.

Avidex AV is revolutionizing the way healthcare facilities and doctors are delivering care. Their 20 years of experience is being leveraged to drive down the cost of care while promoting positive healthcare outcomes. Is your organization looking for a new kind of technology partner? Connect with one of our Account Executives today to learn more.

 

Resources:

https://www.google.com/search?q=JOurney+mapping&oq=JOurney+mapping&aqs=chrome..69i57j0l5.3066j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

http://blog.avidex.com/the-role-of-technology-in-patient-satisfaction/

http://blog.avidex.com/aligning-outcomes/

Jim Scalise

About Jim Scalise

Jim is the Avidex Systems Integrated Group Manager and has been in the AV industry for more than 20 years. Jim oversees and manages the integrated systems team and is directly involved in design, application, project and field engineering as well as sales, service and installation support. Contact Jim at jscalise@avidexav.com

It’s Good to be an Organ “Droner”

Drone photoDrones are everywhere. Applications range from military use for fighting terrorists to aerial photography to recreational use by hobbyists and even Amazon has announced it would like to start using them for package delivery. Imagine being able to deliver packages in dense urban areas without having to worry about traffic or parking. Now imagine that instead of delivering your nephew’s birthday present, the drone is delivering something much more critical…medical care.

Before you scoff at the idea, let me share a quick scenario.

Imagine your 21 year old daughter is in desperate need of a heart transplant. You wring your hands, hoping that somehow a heart will become available in time to save her life. 8 miles away, a 27 year old dies in a car crash. It’s both a tragedy and a miracle as he is an organ donor and his heart is a match. Your heart soars until you remember that the route from the crash to the hospital, that seemingly short 8 miles, takes 2 hours to traverse at this time of day in Chennai, India. It will take another miracle for police to clear the road to get the heart there in time.

This is a true story, and luckily, the second miracle also occurred. A whole team of police had to clear the route for the heart to arrive and they amazingly got it to the hospital in 13 minutes and saved the young girls life. But when minutes are the difference between life and death, should we have to take that chance? Metropolitan areas in New York City and Los Angeles have equally horrific traffic problems. Even dispatching a helicopter may present some delays in getting flight clearances and in finding a suitable landing location. Not only that, helicopters are a limited resource that may not be readily available for organ transportation. So isn’t there a better way?

Some students in Spain thought there was, and they developed a purpose built drone with a refrigerated storage compartment specifically for the purpose of transporting organs quickly and efficiently from one location to another. They are currently running a test program in India, and if successful, there is no reason that the same programs couldn’t be implemented in the US as well.

Drones in healthcare may not be so far-fetched after all.

Now think of extended applications. What about a drone that delivers medical care to those trapped in a mine? Or drone that uses a video teleconferencing system to respond to an accident and give bystanders instructions on what to do until the paramedics arrive? Or a drone that includes a defibrillator for a heart attack victim? (Here’s a great video on that idea as well.) The scenarios abound.

Then consider that the size and cost of the drones mean that a large network of them could be deployed. Imagine a series of roadside pedestal “garages” with drones at the ready every few miles, able to be dispatched to accidents and assess injury severity for positioning more scarce EMT and Paramedic resources. Now that may be very valuable indeed.

All too often we see technology positioned in films and pop culture as being a potential threat to the human race. However, in today’s world it seems technology is once again in the service of saving lives instead. After all, it’s good to be an organ “droner”.

Avidex AV is revolutionizing the way healthcare facilities and doctors are delivering care. Their 20 years of experience is being leveraged to drive down the cost of care while promoting positive healthcare outcomes. Is your organization looking for a new kind of technology partner? Connect with one of our Account Executives today to learn more.

Resources:

#1: http://www.newsweek.com/2016/02/05/india-organ-transplant-drones-419013.html

#2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y-rEI4bezWc

#3: http://www.tudelft.nl/en/current/latest-news/article/detail/ambulance-drone-tu-delft-vergroot-overlevingskans-bij-hartstilstand-drastisch/

Jim Scalise

About Jim Scalise

Jim is the Avidex Systems Integrated Group Manager and has been in the AV industry for more than 20 years. Jim oversees and manages the integrated systems team and is directly involved in design, application, project and field engineering as well as sales, service and installation support. Contact Jim at jscalise@avidexav.com

Video infrastructure- Are you ready for the coming demands of video communication on your network?

Video communication is becoming an increasingly integral part of modern business, including healthcare. From orientation videos to streaming video content to videoconferencing and remote collaborative projects, video is changing the way we interact with each other and with our technology. However, the vast, practically limitless potential of video communication comes with a tradeoff: an equally vast demand on your network.

streaming mediaDemands of Video Communication on Your Network

It’s estimated that video content currently accounts for over 90% of internet traffic. An hour’s worth of HD video takes up multiple gigabytes of memory. Just posting a brief video to YouTube requires a fair amount of bandwidth. Live streaming and recording an HD videoconference, which can often last over an hour, is a whole other ballgame than regular, non-video internet browsing.

Therefore, if you’re going to implement video into your company’s policies effectively, you need to make sure that your network is equipped to handle it. You need to ensure that you have the capacity to handle large chunks of high definition video at one time, uninterrupted. And you need to make sure you have the capacity to deliver high definition video to your audience, whether on a desktop computer, smartphone tablet, or any other kind of device, anywhere on the planet.

Budgeting Bandwidth for Video Communication

So, how much bandwidth does your network need in able to handle and accommodate video communication? That depends on your company and your usage. Sit down and plan out exactly how much video will be used in an average day, week, or month, and what you plan on using it for. Will you be uploading content to YouTube? Streaming live feeds of lectures and conferences to your employees? Making video calls? Performing 24 hour video surveillance? And how much of that will be done in HD, vs. standard definition?

There are worksheets and other tools online that can help calculate the demands of video communication on your network based on a variety of factors. Do the math and get an estimate of approximately how much memory you’ll be using on video in an average month, based on your current equipment’s capabilities and your estimated usage. Then, make sure that your network servers are prepared to handle a load that’s considerably higher than that. First of all, it’s important to err on the side of caution. Second of all, you need to prepare for growth.

The popularity, versatility, and overall prevalence of video communication are only going to increase over time. It’s best to equip yourself for that increased usage now, rather than being caught with your pants down a few months to a year from now, and facing slow connections, long load times, and choppy, poor quality video.

Determining the demands of video communication on your network will help you optimize that network and maintain the best possible video experience for your employees and your customers. As video communication becomes increasingly prevalent in today’s business world, poor quality video and slow load times will no longer be tolerated. Unless your network is able to keep up with your video usage, you’ll be left behind. But if you can meet the demands of video communication on your network, then from video content to videoconferencing, there’s no limit to what your organization can accomplish.

Jim Scalise

About Jim Scalise

Jim is the Avidex Systems Integrated Group Manager and has been in the AV industry for more than 20 years. Jim oversees and manages the integrated systems team and is directly involved in design, application, project and field engineering as well as sales, service and installation support. Contact Jim at jscalise@avidexav.com